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PRST 300-Spring 2016: Work Skills: Communication & Writing

What do Employers Value?

Bloomberg skills gap

Source: Bloomberg. (2015). The Bloomberg recruiter report: Job skills compnaies want but can't get. Retrieved from http://www.bloomberg.com/graphics/2015-job-skills-report/

Here are the 10 skills employers say they seek, in order of importance:

1. Ability to work in a team

2. Ability to make decisions and solve problems

3. Ability to plan, organize and prioritize work

4. Ability to communicate verbally with people inside and outside an organization

5. Ability to obtain and process information

6. Ability to analyze quantitative data

7. Technical knowledge related to the job

8. Proficiency with computer software programs

9. Ability to create and/or edit written reports

10. Ability to sell and influence others

 

Source:  Forbes (2013). The 10 skills employers most want in 20-something employees. Retrieved from http://www.forbes.com/sites/susanadams/2013/10/11/the-10-skills-employers-most-want-in-20-something-employees/#3a71b60e752d.

Basic Skills

These skills are the foundation of your career building blocks. The ability to read with understanding, also known as reading comprehension, is critical to successful employment. If you cannot fully understand the instructions on how to apply for a job, you are at a disadvantage. Many jobs require reading as part of the duties. There are reports, memos, emails and safety requirements that are part of day to day functions of the job. Poor reading skills will cause you to lag behind other workers because it takes you more time to understand and interpret what you are reading. 

Employers look for people who communicate well both orally and in writing. You need communication skills to sell yourself during the interview. Being able to convey your thoughts both verbally and in writing helps you to be understood by your coworkers. Good communication means better relationships in the work environment. Listening skills involve not only hearing but understanding. The sign that you were listening is that you can act on the information that you heard. Listening means gaining information and understanding information. Math is also part of making decisions and reasoning. Basic math skills are used in the work place when purchasing and ordering supplies, following a budget, or just managing your vacation time. 

Source: AARP Foundation. (n.d.). What skills are employers looking for? Retrieved from http://www.aarpworksearch.org/Inside/Pages/HowEmployableAmI.aspx