Skip to main content
It looks like you're using Internet Explorer 11 or older. This website works best with modern browsers such as the latest versions of Chrome, Firefox, Safari, and Edge. If you continue with this browser, you may see unexpected results.
At this time, Addlestone Library is accessible only to College of Charleston students, faculty, and staff, Friends of the Library, or those with appointments for services offered in the library. NEW Cougar Cards, FOL cards, or appointment emails are required for entry.

WGST 200: Introduction to Women and Gender Studies: Find Sources

Discover CofC Libraries

The Discovery Service provides a single, unified search box for searching the holdings of the College of Charleston Libraries, including scholarly journal articles, books, e-books, newspapers, magazines, internet documents, research reports, research guides, and much more!

Ready to start your research but not sure where to begin? Can't remember what the librarian said during a class? Use the Start your Research button below to get tips and helpful insight! Don't forget you can also schedule an appointment to meet with a librarian for more assistance!

Ask Us

Search for and evaluate books, articles, and media to help with your assignments.

Start your Research

WGST Databases

Social Sciences

 What is a Scholarly Article or Book?

A scholarly article or book generally is based on original research or experimentation. It is written by a researcher or expert in the field who is often affiliated with a college or university. Most scholarly writing includes footnotes and/or a bibliography and may include graphs or charts as illustrations as opposed to glossy pictures. In addition, articles that appear in scholarly journals or book that are published by academic presses, are subject to a peer-review process, which means that other "experts" or specialist in the field evaluate the quality and originality of the research as precondition of publication.

The peer-review (as opposed to editorial review) process is also one thing that sets scholarly journals apart from journals that may otherwise seem quite similar. Journals such as Foreign Affairs, for instance, are generally not considered "scholarly journals," because many of the articles are solicited by the magazine's editors; in addition many of the articles are written by policy-makers who may be expressing an informed view, but whose article may not be based on original research.