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Get Your Research Started: Locate

 

Finding Books 

Find items in College of Charleston Libraries

Catalog Search

 

Search our Catalog by:

  • title - exact title or beginning of the title
  • keyword - word or words (nouns tend to work best) that describe your topic
  • author - last name, first name
  • subject - library subject headings


Don't see what you need in our catalog? Try these:

 

Finding Articles

Discover CofC Libraries

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Limit Your Results

 

What is the Discovery Service?

The Discovery Service provides a single, unified search box for searching the holdings of the College of Charleston Libraries, including scholarly journal articles, books, e-books, internet documents, research reports, and much more!

 

Subject Specific Databases can be incredibly helpful in narrowing results.

  1. Identify a database within a subject area. Use the "All Subjects" drop-down on our Database List to find the ones we recommend!

  2. Search a database using keywords you might expect to find in the title or subject of the article. To get started, use AND to join two keywords together. For example: If  you search cats AND dogs, you will get articles that talk about both of those animals. 
     
  3. Limit your results as necessary and find the best source for your research!

Internet Sites

Google and "The Web" provide access to an incredible amount of information. However, it is incredibly unorganized and full of... questionable facts and spurious opinions. Try some of these tips to help get you to the good stuff faster and more efficiently:

  • Search Strings: Google and most search engines automatically put an "AND" in between all of your search terms. In order to bind a phrase -- the title of a book, an author's name, a well established theory -- use "" qutation marks.
    EXAMPLE: "to be or not to be"
  • Site: You can limit your search to a particular "domain" such as .edu or .gov or to a particular site such as Wall Street Journal (wsj.com) in order to filter out commercial or other random sites.
    EXAMPLE: cloning site:.gov
  • Description: The more unique and descriptive your search terms the more relevant your results will be.
    EXAMPLE: Brandon-Horry House